CSHEMA Fall Symposia provides an opportunity for professionals to learn about and discuss pertinent issues related to specified subject matter.

Registration closes end of day November 12, 2020


Virtual Fall Symposium

Training & Communication | November 16-17, 2020

Join CSHEMA to discuss innovative EHS training and communication methods. We will consider how to incorporate and encourage effective training and communication methods at our institutions, share best practices, and learn how we can better collaborate with each other, our students, and our researchers.

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Schedule

Note: All times below are in Central Standard Time.

Monday, November 16, 2020
9:00 AM - 9:15 AM Opening Session
9:15 AM - 9:25 AM Break
9:25 AM - 10:25 AM Practical and Interactive Safety Training, Presented by Joe Udelhofen
10:25 AM - 10:35 AM Break
10:35 AM - 11:35 AM Improvisation and Role Play for Training EH&S Specialists, Presented by Breena Stoner
11:35 AM - 11:45 AM Break
11:45 AM - 12:45 PM Vendor Tech Session - AppArmor
12:45 PM - 1:15 PM Lunch
1:15 PM - 2:15 PM A Cup of Coffee in No Man’s Land Between Graduate Researchers and Safety Personnel, Presented by Jessica Martin
2:15 PM - 2:25 PM Break
2:25 PM - 3:35 PM Vendor Tech Session - Campus Optics, and End of Day - Wrap Up
Tuesday, November 17, 2020
9:00 AM - 9:15 AM Welcome
9:15 AM- 9:25 AM Break
9:25 AM - 10:25 AM Unique Online Courses for Chemical Hygiene Officers, Presented by Lisa Lenertz
10:25 AM - 10:35 AM Break
10:35 AM - 11:35 AM Roundtable Discussion, with the Markeitng/Communications & Educations Community, Presented by Heather Coats
11:35 AM - 12:05 PM Lunch
12:05 PM - 1:05 PM Web & Document Accessibility for Safety Professional, Presented by Brock Young
1:05 PM - 1:15 PM Break
1:15 PM - 2:25 PM Training Techniques Virtually - How You Can Be Un-Boring, Presented by Janette de la Rosa Ducut, + End of Conference Wrap Up

*Schedule Subject to change.*


Session Descriptions
Practical and Interactive Safety Training

Presented by Joe Udelhofen, Carleton College
Providing safety training can be challenging for all of us, especially for small EHS departments. At Carleton College, we have partnered with our facilities management team to create local ownership for their training. This collaborative effort has developed into training that is both practical and interactive for all participants. Training topics are experienced rather than purely lectured. Attendees will learn about our interactive Amazing Race-themed safety training and experience one of our bloodborne pathogens cleanup activities. Using fake blood made with dish soap, we will demonstrate proper cleanup and disposal techniques. This session will reinforce the importance and necessity of local ownership combined with creativity for required safety training.

Training Techniques: How You Can Be Un-Boring

Presented by Janette de la Rosa Ducut, University of California–Riverside
Do your faculty, staff, and students think training is boring? Most do, which leads to a lack of learning. To combat this, the University of California implemented cutting-edge training techniques to engage memory and safe decision-making. This includes mobile phones, augmented reality, active learning techniques, simulations, and interactive online training activities. Additionally, safety professionals create a middle management layer which also must be equipped with professional education and certification. Overall, training must be viewed as one part of a larger system. This session will:

  1. Compare and contrast different online training methods
  2. Experience augmented reality (similar to virtual reality)
  3. Practice using an audience response system
  4. Identify the role of training within a larger safety system
A Cup of Coffee in No Man’s Land Between Graduate Researchers and Safety Personnel

Presented by Jessica Martin, University of Connecticut
Communication is key to maintaining safety in research laboratories. Over the last several decades, industry has been taking on the challenge of strengthening relationships between researchers and safety personnel resulting in improved safety records. Dow Chemical and ExxonMobil have been running programs over the last several years to reach out to partner universities to share lessons learned in the strengthening of a positive culture of safety in chemical research laboratories. This has triggered the growth of the modern laboratory safety team movement led by graduate and postdoctoral researchers. A huge emphasis in this movement has been to increase the frequency and value of interactions between graduate and post-doctoral researchers on one side and safety personnel on the other side. Most teams have been delighted to see their university’s EHS and research safety personnel support their efforts as they increase their understanding of the safety hierarchy within their institutions. This support helps them develop ways to contribute to the strengthening of the culture of safety that ultimately impacts these researchers most of all.

In this roundtable, I will be presenting my findings in a recent publication outlining the growth and current state of LSTs throughout the United States and invite attendees to share their own experiences interacting with graduate and post-doctoral researchers at their respective institutions. Sometimes, the solutions to intransigent problems can be found over a cup of coffee in "No Man’s Land."

Improvisation and Role Play for Training and EHS Specialists

Presented by Breena Stoner, University of California–Los Angeles
In 2018, UCLA research safety implemented a system of no-fault meetings with researchers called Safety Checkups. The meetings supplement and sometimes replace standard laboratory inspections and are generally held during a lab’s group meeting with as many members of the lab as possible. To build core skills for these meetings and ensure consistency across individuals and divisions, accompanying monthly practice sessions were instated. Each practice session begins with an improv activity and involves either role-playing simulations of interactions with labs or activities designed to build specific soft skills. Role-playing activities include lab profiles with research summaries, individual motivations and characteristics for “lab members,” and real concerns and questions from past Safety Checkups. Soft skills sessions have included specific training on building rapport, asking good questions, handling “difficult” groups, and saying “no.” After several skill-building sessions, the next role-playing activity provides an opportunity to practice these skills, and participants provide immediate feedback. Practice sessions have been received positively by EHS staff and grew quickly from biosafety alone to incorporate chemical safety and, most recently, the rest of the research safety team. Implementing this practice has improved interactions with researchers and other campus clients and increased awareness of previously unknown safety issues.

Unique Online Courses for Chemical Hygiene Officers

Presented by Lisa Lenertz, University of Wisconsin–Madison
Being a laboratory chemical hygiene officer (CHO) can be a daunting task, and many CHOs are unaware of their specific duties. Staff at the University of Wisconsin–Madison developed an online course titled "My Boss Made Me a Chemical Hygiene Officer, Now What?" to help CHOs prepare for routine chemical safety visits and improve the safety in their workspaces. Topics of the course include the development of a chemical hygiene plan, housekeeping, emergency equipment, hazard communication, chemical storage, specific chemicals (e.g. hydrofluoric acid, sodium azide), compressed gas cylinders and personal protective equipment. The participants can pick and choose the information they want to view and are encouraged to contact us if they would like more topics added. They can stay enrolled as long as they want and refer back to the course whenever they would like. Over 100 laboratory CHOs have enrolled. In addition to the laboratory CHO course, we are developing a highly interactive online course about performing a risk assessment. In this course, participants choose from a list of procedures to complete a risk assessment for. The list includes molecular biology, chemistry and engineering-centric procedures. Learners will be prompted to consider the hazards of their chosen procedure, 'what if?' scenarios, the probability and consequences of the 'what if?' scenarios, and how to mitigate risk. They will answer several multiple-choice, true/false, drag-and-drop, and pick-many questions when working through the tutorial. In addition, participants may submit a risk assessment of their choice as an “assignment” in order to receive feedback.

Roundtable Discussion

Moderated by Heather Coats, Co-Leader of the Marketing/Communications & Education Community
Join Heather Coats, unit manager of training and outreach at Texas Tech University and co-leader of the CSHEMA Marketing/Communications & Education Community, for a roundtable discussion on marketing/communication in the campus EHS world! Please bring your questions and topics for discussion with the group.

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